Robert Gould Shaw in the Civil War


robert Gould Shaw in the Civil War

Carolina, on July 16, 1863. Abolitionist Eliza Sedgwicks 1865 poem about Shaw contained the lines: Buried with the men God gave himThose who he was sent to save; Buried with the martyred heroes, He has found an honored grave. The weapon's whereabouts was one of the war's great mysteries. Nevertheless, even in the few days immediately after the bloodbath, Shaw had become, in the North, an uncommon martyr for the principle of black emancipation, and sentiment sprang forth to exert every effort to exhume his body and rebury him back in his hometown. Shaws mother and father did not have a patronizing view of the relationship between their son and his men and indeed shared a sentiment of African American empowerment that was embodied in a line from Lord Byron that abolitionists often"dWho would be free themselves. "You can imagine what a prize that would be for a Confederate soldier Bentley said.

The family had previously donated a different sword that Shaw carried when he served in the 2nd Massachusetts regiment before he was given command of the 54th. Glory, that depicted the actions of the 54th Massachusetts at Fort Wagner. That's where the trail ended. The Shaw family also placed a bronze tablet in memory of Robert Gould Shaw on an earlier-installed cenotaph in its family plot at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Boston. Much of the previous site of Fort Wagner has been eroded away, including the place where the Union soldiers had been buried. Both Shaws father and mother were early ardent abolitionists (Shaws playmates included, william Lloyd Garrison s children). It is believed Minturn gave it to her grandson when he was a teen.

Robert Gould Shaw in the Civil War
robert Gould Shaw in the Civil War


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